I wanted to make my Apricot Jam recipe a little more readable and printable for myself and you get the benefit too! This recipe is the print friendly version of this recipe and assumes you have done preserving before.


Apricot Honey Jam (smaller batch version)

  • 7 cups crushed Apricots
  • 1 cups Honey (add to taste, this amount makes a semi-tart jam)
  • 3 T Lemon Juice
  • 1 box No-sugar needed Pectin (optional)

Clean jars and rings. Put lids in hot water. Wash and then crush apricots using a food mill, blender, or potato masher. Put in large stock pot as the jam will “spit.” Add honey and lemon juice. Cook over medium to medium high heat until thickened, stirring frequently to avoid burning. (Use a long handled spoon or even a spatula.) It may take about 45 minutes to cook the pectin out of the apricots. If you add some greener apricots there will be more pectin in the fruit but the jam will be a little more tart. You can add in the box of pectin otherwise. Add more honey to taste if necessary. Ladle into hot jars, wipe around the tops with a clean washcloth, add a lid and ring. Process in a steam or water-bath canner according to your altitude. 0-1000 ft above sea level: 20 minutes for pints, 25 minutes for quarts. Add 2 minutes processing time for every 1000 ft in elevation above sea level.

Makes approximately 2 quarts or 4 pints of jam.

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Apricot Honey Jam (larger batch version)

  • 42 cups crushed Apricots
  • 6 cups Honey (add to taste, this amount makes a semi-tart jam)
  • 7/8 cup Lemon Juice
  • 6 box No-sugar needed Pectin (optional)

Clean jars and rings. Put lids in hot water. Wash and then crush apricots using a food mill, blender, or potato masher. Put in large stock pot as the jam will “spit.” Add honey and lemon juice. Cook until thickened, stirring frequently to avoid burning. (Use a long handled spoon or even a spatula.) It may take about 45 minutes to cook the pectin out of the apricots. If you add some greener apricots there will be more pectin in the fruit but the jam will be a little more tart. You can add in the boxes of pectin otherwise. Add more honey to taste if necessary. Ladle into hot jars, wipe around the tops with a clean washcloth, add a lid and ring. Process in a steam or water-bath canner according to your altitude. 0-1000 ft above sea level: 20 minutes for pints, 25 minutes for quarts. Add 2 minutes processing time for every 1000 ft in elevation above sea level.

Makes approximately 12 quarts or 24 pints of jam.

We’ve been blessed with an abundance of apples again this year. Of course, I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to preserve them all! I made dried apple rings with those without worms and major blemishes. Thanks to my apple peeler/slicer, I can get them done quickly. I simply run it through the peeler, cut it down the side for rings, put in lemon water for a couple of minutes, and then place the rings in my dehydrator. It takes about half the day to dehydrate them enough. I can get about 10-12 medium-large apples at a time in the dehydrator. Instead of making apple-pie filling in jars this year, we’re just dehydrating the apples to use later for the same purpose. It saves the use of new lids and jars as well!

So, I sort-of made a tutorial for Applesauce and juice. I hope it’s helpful!

Applesauce and Apple Juice
Step 1: Pick apples from tree
Step 2: Wash Apples, throwing away rotten ones and any leaves

Step 3: Cut up apples. (Mine are golden delicious apples.) Large apples should be cut into 6-8 pieces. Smaller apples can be cut into quarters.

Step 4: Put clean, cut up apples slices into the colander part of the steam juicer. Steam for 12-15 minutes depending upon size of apples and fullness of juicer. If you don’t steam them enough, the applesauce will be too juicy. If you steam them too much, they will be to pasty; however, too pasty means you can add back the juice from the steam juicer. It’s harder to take the juice out of the sauce, so steam the apples more.

Step 5: Take steamed apples and put them in the victorio strainer and push down through hole and crank handle.
Each batch in the steam juicer (if filled fairly full) makes about 2 1/2 quarts of applesauce or about 5 pints.

I use a cake pan for the applesauce because it fits nicely underneath the strainer, but you can use what you want/have/like.

Step 6: Put 2 Tablespoons of Lemon Juice in each quart jar for acidity and color preserving. If using pints, use 1 tablespoon per pint.

Step 7: Using a jar funnel, scoop applesauce into jars on top of lemon juice. Fill to bottom of funnel or about 1/2 head space. Use a knife to help get large air bubbles out.

Step 8: Wipe top of jar clean and put on a warmed new canning jar lid. Put on ring. Your applesauce is now ready for the steam canner.

Step 9: Put jars into steam canner. Make sure there is always enough water. The water should be just below the rack. When steam is continuously flowing out of the holes 8 inches, start counting the processing time. Process for 20 minutes at sea level. (Adjust according to your altitude. Add 2 minutes for each 1000 ft above sea level.) Let sit for 2-3 minutes after turning off heat. Carefully remove lid so that the steam escapes away from you.

Step 10: Remove processed jars carefully from canner. I love my jar tongs! Place on flat surface, and on dry towels if you’re worried about the surface you’re putting the jars on. Never put the jars on a very cold surface. They will crack or break. Make sure your bottles are where you can leave them alone for 24 hours to cool.

Enjoy the fruits of your labor! Don’t they look pretty?

To help you get an idea of how many batches of apples I went through, I had to follow steps 2-8 twice to have enough to process 7 jars in the steam canner. As I finished each jar, I would place it on the canner until it was full. Then I would start the canner.

Apple Juice
Remember to carefully pour the apple juice out of the steamer into HOT jars. You simply unclamp the tube and pour into hot jars. Reclamp after you’re done. Sometimes I pour the juice into a plastic pitcher so that I don’t need to worry about changing out jars before the juice is gone from the steamer.

Put a clean lid and ring on them and process with applesauce or on their own (they take 10 minutes per quart, add 1 minute per 1000 ft above sea level). It won’t hurt to process them longer though.

P.S. Gotta love our “clamp” for the juicing tube. It’s not normally what would be used to clamp the tube closed during steaming, but we didn’t have the proper clamp, and my genius husband made one for me. Thanks, honey!

{Update: For a printer-friendly version of the recipe, click here.}

My family was blessed with an abundance of apricots this year…again! I used to bottle apricots and make jam, but now I like to freeze them to keep them raw for smoothies and to eat later. I wash and halve them, lay them in gallon size bags in one layer, and then stack the bags in the freezer. Once frozen I sometimes combine bags, but they store better in a flat layer.

Since my family and I love apricot jam, I couldn’t help making an alternative to the super-sugary type I used to make. So, my husband and I came up with a new recipe and made 23 quarts of Apricot Jam made with Honey. (I won’t eat the refined sugar.) I think we may have overdone the amount, but we love apricot jam around our house, so we’ll see if it’s too much.


Apricot Honey Jam
42 cups crushed Apricots
6 cups Honey (add to taste, this amount makes a semi-tart jam)
7/8 cup Lemon Juice

Makes approx. 12 quarts of jam.

First we had to pick all the apricots. My next door neighbor’s tree wasn’t quite ripe enough, but a lady in my ward had 8 trees or so. Aurora and Lightning came and picked with me. We picked a bunch and brought them all home. I have to say that a wagon is a life saver when you have to transport heavy buckets/boxes back to the van!

When we were ready to make the jam, we sorted, washed, halved, and pitted the apricots. Apricots are really easy to open when they are ripe. Just put your finger in the natural split and it opens right up. My kids could help with that task. Of course we threw away all the pits. I’m not personally interested in sprouting and planting my own apricot trees when there are so many in my neighborhood whose fruit would go to waste.

Next we used my Vitamix blender to crush the apricots instead of using the hand-crank food grinder we used to use. We wrote down how much we put into the giant 32-quart stock pot since we’re making this recipe up based on other apricot recipes we’ve used. We added the lemon juice and honey (add to taste) and stirred it well.

We turned the heat on the stove and waited for it to boil, while stirring it frequently. Once it was boiling, we continued to stir it frequently for about 45 minutes while it thickened up a bit. If you don’t want to wait that long, just buy boxes of pectin to add. The no-sugar kind I have says 1 box per 6 cups of fruit. The reason why we boil it for so long is that apricots naturally have pectin in them, you just have to heat it long enough to thicken it. Just an FYI: the greener apricots have the most pectin, but the jam has less flavor if you use a lot of them.

Once the jam was thicker, we ladled it into hot jars, wiped off the tops, put a hot lid on, and tightened the ring (not too tight). Next we put them in the canner. I have a steam canner, but a water-bath canner works well too. Since I’m around 4300 ft above sea level, I steamed the bottles for 33 minutes, then removed them to the counter where they could sit for 24 hours and cool down. If you’d like to know how to adjust for altitude and processing time, here is a great resource! All of the jars sealed within the first couple of hours, although if they hadn’t after they were cool, I would have refrigerated them or re-processed them.

I could tell the jam wasn’t “set” yet, but I understand that it can take apricot jam 2 weeks to set completely. Also, since I didn’t add any additional pectin other than what was in the fruit itself, it likely won’t set like the store-bought jams. Actually, I don’t think I’ve had any of my jams set like store-bought jams, even when I used pectin, unless I used a ton of sugar in the recipe.

The batches of jam we did this year are not runny or super-sweet. So if you want a very sweet and completely set jam, you’ll need to add pectin and regular sugar instead of following my recipe above. There is great information and recipes on this site if you want to learn more about canning. Why reinvent the wheel, right?

I’ve wanted to post this for a while, but I haven’t had the time lately. I’ve been sort of MIA in a lot of things regarding the computer. It has been good on many ways but not so much in other ways. :D

I’m so blessed and grateful for the miracle that happened last week. I’d been thinking about why I hadn’t had the abundance of tomatoes and apples like I had last year. It finally hit me (it took long enough) that I never asked for it. Of course! So, Saturday night as I was saying my bedtime prayers, I asked for tomatoes because I wanted to make salsa and continue with our food storage despite having some financial difficulties. I knew He would provide, even if I didn’t know how or where it would come from.

The next morning, I went to church and came home. At 2pm I had a Primary Presidency meeting, so I left baby Peter napping with Dh and went to the church. I walk into the foyer of the church, and my neighbor (and Primary President) was sitting there waiting for the rest of us to arrive for the meeting. The first thing she said to me was, “Do you want tomatoes?” I was shocked and amazed! I gave her an emphatic, “Yes!” and she told me she’d pick them if I watched her toddler and made her some salsa.

She and my dh picked 6+ bushels–all for free from a field near our Bishop’s home. I can’t describe my amazement that Heavenly Father provided such a simple, yet profoundly large blessing to me and my family so quickly! That same Sunday evening, we asked the kids to pray for zucchini, and well, another neighbor let me come pick from her garden yesterday and we have several huge zucchini now. It’s such a simple thing…asking for what you want, but it’s amazing how the Lord grants what we ask, whether it is tomatoes and zucchini or money. He will provide even if we don’t know how or where it will come from. His timing may not be ours, but he’s never late!


tomatoes 1

tomatoes 2

tomatoes 3

Since that experience, I see His hand in my life so much more. I’m not so afraid to ask for things anymore either! I’ve been wanting applesauce and filling this year, and well, we have the apples for the applesauce for sure! I love the harvest season, but I love my Heavenly Father more for His mindfulness of us.

Dh and I put up more peaches last night.  We were up WAY too late (2am) getting it all done including processing time.  Dh bought two cases of peaches for $0.69/pound (the only peaches we’ve bought this year).  The two cases contained 90 peaches total.  The peaches were HUGE.  I couldn’t fit one hand around the outside of one peach.  The box called them O’Henry Peaches. We put up 14 quarts of peach pie filling and 12 quarts of peaches (it would have been 13, but one bottle broke during processing). We even kept 10 out to eat and gave 6 to dh’s parents. Wow! It didn’t seem like we bought a ton of peaches. :)

I wish I had my mom’s digital camera to take a picture of our storage rooms. They’re full of preserved fruit, jam, pasta, grains, and veggies (although the veggies are store bought…lol).  We’ve been buying cases of bottled water at Costco.  We’ve pretty much run out of space for them.  So, we’re going to get a couple 50 gallon barrels from Kitchen Kneads for storing water outside too.  We’ve been working hard on our food storage and self-sufficiency this year. It’s truly a blessing and a marvelous feeling to know we’re doing our best to heed the prophet’s counsel to be prepared.